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"Splash"- 6.9.15 Toile La La collage. Toile La La is a research blog for fashion design, ART, history, and creativity in every shape, form, and fashion.

Tuesday, June 21, 2016

STITCHT magazine



 
STITCHT magazine header, photo Toile La La
Interests in collage, fashion fascination, and the psychology of fashion culminated in the evolution of STITCHT magazine - which is stitched, glued, and taped together.
Each issue of STITCHT is one-of-a-kind and there are only two recipients - my friends M and No.4 (pronounced Number Four).  The very last day of 2015, I interviewed No.4 while she painted and updated her art journal. Later that night, beneath a foggy full moon - No.4 stomped the dark in sequins and Doc Martens for a few photos.  M snail-mailed her interview responses.  The first few issues of STITCHT were created from random fashion ephemera and old photos hiding in cupboards.
The Fashion Research Questionnaire below was conducted with both M and No.4, who vary in age and sartorial preferences.  Following the interview are pages from Issues 1-5 of STITCHT.  STITCHT was tailored to raise the eyebrows of both M and No.4 who have a healthy sense of humor - as well as artistic sensibilities.
Fashion Research Questionnaire
1: When you shine your brightest, set the scene... sound, look, atmosphere...
M:  I'm rollerblading on an empty, smooth sidewalk in September. Or, cooking dinner with friends and I'm in charge of the cheesecake and music. It's cool outside, but indoors is warm and smells delicious. Relaxing.

No.4:  Downtown, to look for records with my boyfriend and my cousin with her boyfriend. I'd wear a 2-piece matching set, a crop top with a short fitted skirt - light blue and white vertical stripes... black chunk heels or maybe my black hi-top Converse. Hair in a french braid on top, probably straightened.

2: Playlists -
M:  I make 4 playlists each year. Very long. One for each season - and they grow and grow until the next season begins. Funky or happy or foreign music are my fave.
No.4:  BIG CHOCOLATE - oneB, blue milk, slap you down, yodel knockin, HALSEY - badlands, MAC MILLER, sometimes I listen to 90s rap beats for art. Hey Mami, the Big Wild remix by SYLVAN ESSO is like the song of my soul. If I heard that song somewhere, I would probably just scream. A$AP Rocky - beats are what I like. Kendrick Lamar. Childish Gambino. I like Halsey's pink record. 21 PILOTS - the lyrics to Car Window, "PEACE will WIN & fear will lose"... I live by that song. The second verse is like you've found a treasure. I like Blurry Face - the new album. Test & Recognize. The Wheel by SOHN.

3: Are there particular colors or textures that inspire you?
M:  Warm caramel tones, mustard yellow (any yellow really), soft pink nude shades... nubby fabrics, slinky bouncy fabric with tiny-barely-visible sheen/sparkles, checks, stripes, teeny florals.
No.4:  Lately I'm inspired by green, but I like black and red. Mostly I wear just black. I like denim, soft sweatshirts, silky material.
4: Do you prefer any certain season?
M:  Spring is my Number One season because the birds are so feisty! Also there's fresh fruit - and the days get longer.
No.4:  IV - Fall, the changing, the temperature - and as far as dressing... wearing sweatshirts/sweaters.
  
5: What makes you feel most vibrant, strong, or in your element?
M:  Using the "ole noggin" to figure something out. Cooking for myself. Reading magazines in a steamy morning bath with a peaceful-smelling candle and no obligations. Riding the streetcar.
No.4:  Being creative, feeling timeless, being in the dorm room or hanging out with friends - pranking or dancing.
6: Your preferred silhouette?
M:  The right side of my face. My shadow on a midsummer day - because my legs look miles long.
No.4:  I like to accentuate my waist and ribcage. For formal - fit and flare.
  
7: Favorite mode of transportation?
M:  Roller blades!!! Whizzing by in the bike lane. I also love the streetcar. Sailing through clouds in a hot air balloon, too.
No.4:  Skateboarding, but if trampolining were a mode of transportation - I'd choose that. But skateboarding - it's like a show... it requires balance and skill. It's like an art. And that's why I like dancing or producing music too - it's expressing yourself. I don't like rules.

8: Dance licks?
M:  Not sure what this means, BUT if I was dancing by myself, I'd say pistachio ice cream. If I'm dancing to fast music, then a scoop of peppermint stick to cool me down.
No.4:  Refer to Question 2 – Playlists.
9: When I say layers - what does it mean to you?
M:  Either a lemon creme fancy French cake... or it reminds me of wearing loads of layers of clothing to go sledding. Layers are sweet - or warm and snuggly.
No.4:  People have a lot of layers. You go through things and it adds onto you... layers of experience. Sometimes you have to dig through layers to get someone to open up.

10: Any icons or inspiration...

 
M:  Alexa Chung, Maira Kalman, people who compost. Also, my cat because she is stripey.
No.4:  Rihanna, who's very bold - a dramatic bombshell, edgy, sexy, a fantastic singer! Cara Delevingne, who's very herself. She's not afraid to be herself and is encouraging to others and Cara's very funny! I like Gwen Stefani, Madonna, Lana Del Rey - and she would be on my playlist too. Her new album Honeymoon is mysterious and dark. Also Sky Ferreira, her Red Lips song.
  
11: Summarize your preferred look/looks-
M:  Soft and clean and cheerful and quirky. Cuffed overalls with banana socks, tan striped t-shirt, denim bucket hat, boots, yellow coat.
No.4:  My preferred look is skater/grunge. Zumiez or PacSun that's my style. Black hi-top Converse. If I had to grab something - Doc Martens!

(Here's M - at least one side of her... .  Photos of No.4 appear in STITCHT photos following the interview.) 
M, in overalls - polish exact same lilac as jacket around waist!
 
12: Socks/tights/wedge/stiletto/bare?
M:  Socks for life! Stripey socks or feminine socks or cool, textured ones. Always tall, never ankle socks.
No.4:  Thigh high socks with shorts and a flannel shirt. Or a black trench and thigh highs or sheer tights with designs.

13: How many hats does your head house?
M:  Three, if you mean different "characters" I notice myself being. If actual hats, eight. I have 8 hats, but my faves are the 2 plain toboggans or knit hats, a denim bucket hat, and a cap with a banana I embroidered.
No.4:  Two. A snap-back, worn backwards, it's black and says "fresh" in white cursive. Under the bill it's floral. And a navy pompon beanie with the London Flag. The Union Jack.
  
14: Spirit animal-
M:  My cat, a touch-me-not house cat that still wants attention. Or a curious little bird with good vision and bad balance.
No.4:  My cat, Luna, is my spirit animal - very carefree.
15: Lucky talismans-
M:  Hey Hey Hey, a plastic Fat Albert figurine from the 70s. He goes most places with me. My secret source of power.
No.4:  Signature pieces are my high school class ring and my backpack purse. I like vanilla... sweet-smelling, sugary fragrances.
16: Your ambience / ideal zone?
M:  The bathtub in the morning with the window open and a light rain outside. A fort with homemade mini pizzas. A treehouse on my own with a good audiobook and headphones.
No.4: In London, dim lighting, with BIG CHOCOLATE playing. Beanbags all around, people dancing and having fun. A big bass system and neon lights, black lights, color changing lights, giant lava lamps. With a tamed lion, Luna, foxes and other interesting animals.

Image emphasis in these issues is - "shining bright", and hats.  I made the stitched collages and the fold-out booklet. 



Sofa and Lamp, collage by Toile La La - December 2015

Sofa and Lamp, collage by Toile La La - December 2015

STITCHT magazine, Toile La La

STITCHT mail for M, collage envelope Toile La La
STITCHT mail for No.4, collage envelope Toile La La







No.4: Sequin Moon, photo by Toile La La

STITCHT fold-out brochure featuring No. 4 - photos Toile La La

STITCHT fold-out brochure featuring No. 4 - photos Toile La La

STITCHT fold-out brochure featuring No. 4 - photos Toile La La

STITCHT fold-out brochure featuring No. 4 - photos Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage and stitch work Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage, wordcraft, and stitch work Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage and stitch work Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage and stitch work Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage and stitch work Toile La La

STITCHT magazine, header collage and stitch work Toile La La

Monday, June 20, 2016

19th and 20th Century Artist Interiors: Painted Documents

2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies by Jennifer Hawkins Hock are gimlet-eyed views of 19th and 20th century interiors painted by artists.  2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies presents assemblages of 15 paintings featuring as their subject artists' portraits of their own studios or domestic interiors.  Group One includes three-dimensional assemblage studies of room portraits by Henri Matisse, Gwen John, Edouard Vuillard, Pierre Bonnard, Rene Magritte, Raoul Dufy, Gustave Caillebotte, Frederick Childe Hassam, Vincent van Gogh, and Vilhelm Hammershoi.  Group Two of 2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies is currently in progress and highlights room portraits by Frederic Bazille, Odilon Redon, Vanessa Bell, and the artist's own studio.  Additional rooms by artists featured in Group One will appear as well.

View of a View of a View

Quai Saint-Michel as 2D to 3D Artist Room Study of 1916 Atelier, Quai Saint-Michel by Henri Matisse, followed by a view of Quai Saint-Michel from the Seine:
Artist Room Study 5 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2015

Artist Room Study 5 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2015

Atelier, Quai Saint-Michel - Henri Matisse, 1916

Quai Saint-Michel viewed from the Seine, photo - Jennifer Hawkins Hock





Saturday, June 18, 2016

2D to 3D: Artist Room Studies - A Preview

Exhibition premieres at the blog Art Fashion Creation 6.20.16. Read the Artist Room Studies exhibition notes at this AFC link. Here's a peek at one of the 15 Artist Room Studies:
Artist Room Study 3 Matisse - Jennifer Hawkins Hock, 2014/2016

Wednesday, June 15, 2016

Musee de la Toile de Jouy review

My favorite museum among the many visited during a 10-day trip from London, to Ghent, Bruges, then Paris and around Versailles - is the Musee de la Toile de Jouy.  We traveled via bus (a trip of less than a half hour), found across from the train station - very near the Palace of Versailles entrance.  

During the latter part of the 18th century there occurred a trend  - people of affluence developed an affinity for rustic simplicity.  The Queen's Hamlet of Versailles exhibits this preference for nature and for the charming structures of Norman or Flemish design.  Likewise, many of the fabrics produced in Jouy-en-Josas at this time show a love of the countryside, depicting: orchards, ponds, mills, farm animals, meadows, birds, streams, cascades, flowers, and quaint figures in romantic poses, playing instruments, or tending to chores.

The toile de jouy cloth produced in Jouy-en-Josas by Oberkampf in the 18th century is a wonderful example of art reflecting its environment and of how art reflects popular culture.  To be able to observe the actual landscape which influenced so many of the toile de jouy scenes, and to learn the methods in which the cloth was printed was a true honor.  I hope to visit this beautiful setting again and spend more time in the museum.

Before visiting Musee de la Toile de Jouy, we did roam the Palace of Versailles to which we journeyed from Paris via Metro and then RER (train).  Observing the crowds at the Palace of Versailles, it seems the majority of people prefer to head directly into the sumptuous areas, but we enjoyed a lengthy stroll from the Palace to the Queen's Hamlet, appreciating the design of the grounds.  Earlier in the trip, I marveled at the Salle de Fetes (or grand ballroom) within the Musee d'Orsay - which I deemed comparable to what the Palace of Versailles might offer - extremely lovely and lavish:
Salle de Fetes, Musee d'Orsay - Toile La La photo 2015

Salle de Fetes, Musee d'Orsay - Toile La La photo 2015

Salle de Fetes, Musee d'Orsay - Toile La La photo 2015
But the Queen's Hamlet at the outer grounds of Versailles feels like a breath of fresh air in its sylvan simplicity.  Scroll near the end of my earlier Paris Exploration post - here - to see photos from both Marie-Antoinette's Hamlet and the Musee de la Toile de Jouy. 
toile de jouy - image Musee de la Toile de Jouy
 
image from Musee de la Toile de Jouy website
We visited after our Versailles exploration and allotted only an hour within the museum, which happened to be the hour just before closing.  I would like to spend at least two hours in the museum, studying the exhibits, the cloth - and spend additional time perusing the excellent gift shop.  I was sorry to have to leave, but returning to Paris was simple enough - a short walk to the RER.  More, here at the Musee de la Toile de Jouy website - or their document, in English.


Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Stellar Respiration: Star Breath-Sound

Via asteroseismology I've been listening to the stars breathe today and they sound ready to perform Darude's Sandstorm.  Roaming and researching, I happened upon University of Birmingham studies of resonant oscillation - which reveal the noise or breath within a star, which reveal its age.  Sound and brightness of a star vary with age.  A star's oscillation affects its brightness and scientists are now able to digitally translate that oscillating breath.  Hence, the Moog sound.  Read more about stellar respiration here.

Monday, June 13, 2016

A.L.T.: A Memoir

To achieve an apex of style requires cultivation of perspective and a honing of the intellect - more than lavish expenditure.  Simply, great luxury is to be found in a cultivated state of mind.

To merely listen or observe Andre Leon Talley, one senses cultivation - a cultivaton of tone, a regal bearing, a majestic presence which cannot be feigned - but which is a product of lifelong observation, education, and inherent self-awareness.


Reading A.L.T: A Memoir, we learn a determining factor in the A.L.T of today is his grandmother, who raised him in a strict, clean, healthy environment - free of artifice, but brimming with simple luxuries.  Talley recalls this way of life with heartfelt appreciation - his narrative tone a blend of reverence and tangible, viable pleasure in the senses.  His hard-working, church-going grandmother - Bennie Francis Davis - instilled in Talley, an only child, integrity, altruism, faith, and a loving respect for women.


Growing up, Talley witnessed the pride his grandmother obtained from her job, household chores, and a neat presentation of self (accented by the well-earned and deserved hat or perfect pair of gloves).  We learn she always wore a hat to church and "her shoes always matched her handbag".   Mrs. Davis provided Andre with what she knew to be the best environment a child can have - a safe, clean haven full of good food and good example.  "In our family, cleanliness was so close to godliness that we plain had no congress with grime..., " says Talley, "Through soap and paste wax, rags, mops, and muscle power, I learned that cleaning itself can be restful, and that a well-kept home soothes the mind and spirit, making it easier to contemplate things beyond the physical and the everyday."


And in this well-kept home, Mrs. Davis allowed and encouraged Andre to dream his own dreams and to observe what made their lives special and wonderful... to appreciate the ways in which they were blessed.  In Talley's description of a childhood electric storm - we sense the observing eyes which led to the fashion figure he is today:

"Life after a storm began again with the smell of nature washed clean, a smell as invigorating and reviving as any I have experienced... .  When the storm ended, drops of rain beaded against the window screens and left crystal pearls on the velvety leaves of the geraniums."
Talley's ability to sit still and absorb is also evidenced in his appreciation for books - he says, "I loved everything about them - the musty, disintegrating smell of volumes that hadn't been opened in years and the heady aroma of a brand-new art book with glossy illustrations; the brightly colored graphics on paperback jackets and the faded red, orange, or green spines of library bindings; the sticky-smooth plastic on the books one could take home and the rough, goatskin feel of the revered books in the reference section."

There, in his childhod observations and in his beloved reading, is where Talley began to detect what constituted elegance.  I love his discussion of the "luxury of high style" and his mention of cyclical creation:  "No one has to reinvent the wheel- you just keep turning it around and around, recycling the ideas, the couture that was born in 18th century France spread all over Europe and even to Russia, and affected the art of conversation, the art of food, the art of flirting, the art of living, the art of serving up coffee in a beautiful cup."

Another post - at Art Fashion Creation - with love for ALT and gingham. The pink link will transport you swiftly. Another link here - 2012 SCAD fashion show.

Friday, June 10, 2016

London Exploration, Art Fashion History

Fashion, History, and Art my priorities - a sample of my Fall 2015 exploration... discovered in less than a week's time via metro, train, bus, and on foot.  The London museums are incomparable - staffed with helpful and polite people.  This was a wonderful, wonderful trip with every minute full of art and adventure.  After visiting many of the London museums online and reading reviews, I selected the Victoria and Albert, the National Portrait Gallery London, the London Museum, and Tate Modern London - spending several hours in each.

Victoria and Albert, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

small-scale shirt toile, Victoria and Albert, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

paper dresses, Victoria and Albert, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

deconstructed fashion, Victoria and Albert, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

Victoria and Albert - fashion, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

Victoria and Albert - fashion, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

London 2015 - photo Toile La La

Street Art, Trafalgar Square - London 2015 - photo Toile La La

National Portrait Gallery, London 2015 - photo Toile La La

detail, National Portrait Gallery London


reviewing portrait miniatures, National Portrait Gallery London















Museum of London 2015 - photo Toile La La



London Wall near Museum of London








1760 dollhouse, Museum of London - photo Toile La La

Queen Victoria's dolls, Museum of London - photo Toile La La 2015
Queen Victoria's dolls, Museum of London - photo Toile La La 2015

Queen Victoria's dolls, Museum of London - photo Toile La La 2015

Queen Victoria's dolls, Museum of London - photo Toile La La 2015

Museum of London, sixties film

Museum of London, sixties film

Rebecca Horn Pencil Mask, Tate Modern London - photo Toile La La 2015




Nicholas Hlobo, Lingcamango - Tate Modern London

Seen, Tate Modern London 2015 - photo Toile La La

Seen 2, Tate Modern London 2015 - photo Toile La La
London 2015 - photo Toile La La
London 2015 - photo Toile La La
 All photos - Toile La La, 2015